Tag Archives: Purpose Flour

Wind Chimes in a Bakery – Baking a Red Bean Bun

The Moments Captured on That Morning

Wind Chimes in a Bakery A

Yesterday myself and a big group of bloggers were invited to attend a baking session with Sue (Koe Yeet) and Adam (Ahmad Nabil) who are the main cast for the Samsung Galaxy S4 Wind Chimes in a Baker. It was a fun session. We got close with the casts and we managed to hear their thoughts and questions where thrown to them. It was a fun baking session. Both Sue and Adam were extremely friendly. Naughty they were, flour were flying everywhere. They definitely my two big monkeys ! lol!

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Mini Pizza Pockets at Leggo’s Junior Chef Challenge 2013

Kids Showcase Talent in Cooking Competition

Leggo's Junior Chef Challenge4
Mini Pizza Pockets

Leggo’s, the number one brand for authentic pasta sauces in Australia under the mother company Simplot, organized a fun-packed cooking competition called “Leggo’s Junior Chef Challenge” for kids aged ten to fifteen. Themed “Pasta Bake,” the young participants whipped up scrumptious dishes using only Leggo’s range of pasta bake sauces namely Ricotta & Spinach and Creamy Tomato & Mozzarella at Young Chefs® Academy (YCA) at Desa Sri Hartamas.

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Signature Durian Pancake by Master Chef Thye Yoon Kong

Durian Pancake 1
Durian Pancake

When I was told there was a durian pancake class, I went straight to book myself a seat. I just love them, every single bite is luscious. Soft, smooth, creamy and full of durian aroma. It is truly classic and beatiful to have. Once again Chef Thye Yoon Kong of Zing, Grand Millennium Kuala Lumpur to the control of the kitchen. With his two assistances, he lead the way.

Pancake batter was make from basic ingredients like flour, butter and milk. I was truly simple and the most important part was the pan frying od the pancake using the non-stick pan. Every pancake make was total without floss, just perfect. All it neede was whipped cream and intensified durian paste filled onto the pancake and wrapped over.

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Eclairs . . . Made in Heaven!

La Maison Du Chocolat

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I love this recipe which I took from La Maison Du Chocolat, it was the Carmel Eclairs. The texture was lovely and the cream filling was silky and fragrant too. The cost to make this recipe was inexpensive at all and talent can be nurtured easily. A simple recipe that everyone can follow.

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Ingredients

For the choux pastry
1egg yolk
2eggs
1/2cup whole milk
Pinch of salt
1teaspoon granulated sugar
3tablespoons unsalted butter
1/2cup all purpose flour

For the caramel
6tablespoons granulated sugar
6tablespoons heavy cream

For the pastry cream
1cup milk
2egg yolks
2tablespoons granulated sugar
3tablespoons all-purpose flour

For the glaze
6tablespoons granulated sugar
7oz fondant

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Method

1. Preheat the oven to 400F. Grease a baking sheet. Prepare the choux pastry. Place the egg yolk in a small dish with 1 tablespoon water and beat. Set aside. Break the whole eggs into a mixing bowl and beat. Set aside. Place the milk, salt, sugar and butter in a saucepan and bring to boil. Stir with a spatula and add the flour all at once. Stir continuouly. When the mixture is thoroughly blended and begins to come away from the sides of the pan, cook for a few seconds more, then remove from the heat. Add the beaten whole eggs gradually, in batches, stirring constantly. The mixture should be soft, but not too liquid.

2. Transfer the batter to a pastry bag fitted with a medium round tip. On the prepared baking sheet, pipe out lines of batter about 4 inches long and spaced about 1 1/2 inches apart. Brush the tops with the beaten egg yolk. Bake until golden, 20-30 minutes.

3. Remove from the oven. With a small sharp knife, make a lengthwise slit in the side of each pastry. Set aside to cool. Prepare the caramel. Gradually pour the sugar into a medium size saucepan set over low heat. Cook until the sugar begins to caramalize. As soon as it turns dark bron, remove from the heat and immediately add the cream, taking care not to splatter. Stir, then set aside to cool.

4. Prepare the pastry cream: Place the milk in a saucepan, add 1 teaspoon if the sugar, and bring to a boil. Meanwhile, place the egg yolks in another saucepan, add the remaining sugar, and beat until lemoon-colored. Stir in the flour. Slowly pour in half of he hot milk, whisking continuously, until smooth. Add the remaining milk and place over medium heat. Cook, whisking continuously, until thick. Remove from the heat. Set aside to cool completely, stir often to release steam and prevent the cream from getting soggy. When cool, stir in the caramel. Fill the pasteries with the cooled caramel pastry cream, using the slit in the side.

5. Prepare the glaze: Place the sugar in a saucepan, add 6 tablespoons water, and bring to a boil. Cook for 5 minutes, until a dark caramel color. Remove from the heat, stir in the fondant and place over low heat, stirring until thoroughly blended. Set aside to cool. Glaze the top of each filled pastry with this nixture. Let harden before serving.

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This is a simple recipe that I had found and I found them awesomee delicious but do not keep them to long as they could harden easily within a day or two. I just adore them . . . Love Sunnny Yaw

Feb Daring Baker Challenge – French Bread

Making French Bread:
Step 1: The Dough Mixture – le fraisage (or frasage)

1 cake (0.6 ounce) (20grams) fresh yeast or 1 package dry active yeast
1/3 cup (75ml) warm water, not over 100 degrees F/38C in a glass measure
3 1/2 cup (about 1 lb) (490 gr) all purpose flour, measured by scooping
dry measure cups into flour and sweeping off excess
2 1/4 tsp (12 gr) salt
1 1/4 cups (280 – 300ml) tepid water @ 70 – 74 degrees/21 – 23C

Both Methods: Stir the yeast in the 1/3 cup warm water and let liquefy completely while measuring flour into mixing bowl. When yeast has liquefied, pour it into the flour along with the salt and the rest of the water.

Hand Method: Stir and cut the liquids into the flour with a rubber spatula, pressing firmly to form a dough and making sure that all the bits of flour and unmassed pieces are gathered in. Turn dough out onto kneading surface, scraping bowl clean. Dough will be soft and sticky.

Turn dough out onto kneading surface, scraping bowl clean. Dough will be soft and sticky. Let the dough rest for 2 – 3 minutes while you wash and dry the bowl (and the dough hook if using a stand mixer).

Step 2: Kneading – petrissage
The flour will have absorbed the liquid during this short rest, and the dough will have a little more cohesion for the kneading that is about to begin. Use one hand only for kneading and keep the other clean to hold a pastry scrapper, to dip out extra flour, to answer the telephone, and so forth. Your object in kneading is to render the dough perfectly smooth and to work it sufficiently so that all the gluten molecules are moistened and joined together into an interlocking web. You cannot see this happen, of course, but you can feel it because the dough will become elastic and will retract into shape when you push it out.

Hand Method: Start kneading by lifting the near edge of the dough, using a pastry scraper or stiff wide spatula to help you if necessary, and flipping the dough over onto itself. Scrape dough off the surface and slap it down; lift edge and flip it over again, repeating the movement rapidly.

In 2 -3 minutes the dough should have enough body so that you can give it a quick forward push with the heel of your hand as you flip it over. Continue to knead rapidly and vigorously in this way. If the dough remains too sticky, knead in a sprinkling of flour. The whole kneading process will take 5 – 10 minutes, depending on how expert you become.

Shortly after this point, the dough should have developed enough elasticity so it draws back into shape when pushed, indicating the gluten molecules have united and are under tension like a thin web of rubber; the dough should also begin to clean itself off the kneading surface, although it will stick to your fingers if you hold a pinch of dough for more than a second or two.

Let dough rest for 3 – 4 minutes. Knead by hand for a minute. The surface should now look smooth; the dough will be less sticky but will still remain soft. It is now ready for its first rise.

Step 3: First Rising – pointage premier temps (3-5 hours at around 70 degrees)
You now have approximately 3 cups of dough that is to rise to 3 1/2 times its original volume, or to about 10 1/2 cups. Wash and fill the mixing bowl with 10 1/2 cups of tepid water (70 – 80 degrees) and make a mark to indicate that level on the outside of the bowl. Note, that the bowl should have fairly upright sides; if they are too outward slanting, the dough will have difficulty in rising. Pour out the water, dry the bowl, and place the dough in it

Slip the bowl into a large plastic bag or cover with plastic, and top with a folded bath towel. Set on a wooden surface, marble or stone are too cold. Or on a folded towel or pillow, and let rise free from drafts anyplace where the temperature is around 70 degrees. If the room is too hot, set bowl in water and keep renewing water to maintain around 70 degrees. Dough should take at least 3 – 4 hours to rise to 10 1/2 cups. If temperature is lower than 70 degrees, it will simply take longer.

When fully risen, the dough will be humped into a slight dome, showing that the yeast is still active; it will be light and spongy when pressed. There will usually be some big bubbly blisters on the surface, and if you are using a glass bowl you will see bubbles through the glass.

Step 4: Deflating and Second Rising – rupture; pointage deuxieme temps (1 1/2 to 2 hours at around 70 degrees)
The dough is now ready to be deflated, which will release the yeast engendered gases and redistribute the yeast cells so that the dough will rise again and continue the fermentation process.

With a rubber spatula, dislodge dough from inside of bowl and turn out onto a lightly floured surface, scraping bowl clean. If dough seems damp and sweaty, sprinkle with a tablespoon of flour.

Lightly flour the palms of your hands and flatten the dough firmly but not too roughly into a circle, deflating any gas bubbles by pinching them.

Lift a corner of the near side and flip it down on the far side. Do the same with the left side, then the right side. Finally, lift the near side and tuck it just under the edge of the far side. The mass of dough will look like a rounded cushion.

Slip the sides of your hands under the dough and return it to the bowl. Cover and let rise again, this time to not quite triple, but again until it is dome shaped and light and spongy when touched.


Step 5: Cutting and resting dough before forming loaves
Loosen dough all around inside of bowl and turn out onto a lightly floured surface. Because of its two long rises, the dough will have much more body. If it seems damp and sweaty, sprinkle lightly with flour.

Making clean, sure cuts with a large knife or a bench scraper, divide the dough into:
3 equal pieces for long loaves (baguettes or batards) or small round loaves (boules only)
5 – 6 equal pieces for long thin loaves (ficelles)
10 – 12 equal pieces for small oval rolls (petits pains, tire-bouchons) or small round rolls (petits pains, champignons)
2 equal pieces for medium round loaves (pain de menage or miche only)
If you making one large round loaf (pain de menage, miche, or pain boulot), you will not cut the dough at all and just need to follow the directions below.
After you have cut each piece, lift one end and flip it over onto the opposite end to fold the dough into two; place dough at far side of kneading surface. Cover loosely with a sheet of plastic and let rest for 5 minutes before forming. This relaxes the gluten enough for shaping but not long enough for dough to begin rising again.

While the dough is resting, prepare the rising surface; smooth the canvas or linen towelling on a large tray or baking sheet, and rub flour thoroughly into the entire surface of the cloth to prevent the dough from sticking

Step 6: Forming the loaves – la tourne; la mise en forme des patons

Because French bread stands free in the oven and is not baked in a pan, it has to be formed in such a way that the tension of the coagulated gluten cloak on the surface will hold the dough in shape.

For Long Loaves – The Batard: (Baguettes are typically much too long for home ovens but the shaping method is the same)

After the 3 pieces of dough have rested 5 minutes, form one piece at a time, keeping the remaining ones covered.

Working rapidly, turn the dough upside down on a lightly floured kneading surface and pat it firmly but not too roughly into an 8 to 10 inch oval with the lightly floured palms of your hands. Deflate any gas bubbles in the dough by pinching them.

Fold the dough in half lengthwise by bringing the far edge down over the near edge.

Being sure that the working surface is always lightly floured so the dough will not stick and tear, which would break the lightly coagulated gluten cloak that is being formed, seal the edges of the dough together, your hands extended, thumbs out at right angles and touching.

Roll the dough a quarter turn forward so the seal is on top.

Flatten the dough again into an oval with the palms of your hands.

Press a trench along the central length of the oval with the side of one hand.

Fold in half again lengthwise.

This time seal the edges together with the heel of one hand, and roll the dough a quarter of a turn toward you so the seal is on the bottom.

Now, by rolling the dough back and forth with the palms of your hands, you will lengthen it into a sausage shape. Start in the middle, placing your right palm on the dough, and your left palm on top of your right hand.

Roll the dough forward and backward rapidly, gradually sliding your hands towards the two ends as the dough lengthens.

Deflate any gas blisters on the surface by pinching them. Repeat the rolling movement rapidly several times until the dough is 16 inches long, or whatever length will fit on your baking sheet. During the extension rolls, keep circumference of dough as even as possible and try to start each roll with the sealed side of the dough down, twisting the rope of dough to straighten the line of seal as necessary. If seal disappears, as it sometimes does with all purpose flour, do not worry.

Place the shaped piece of dough, sealed side up, at one end of the flour rubbed canvas, leaving a free end of canvas 3 to 4 inches wide. The top will crust slightly as the dough rises; it is turned over for baking so the soft, smooth underside will be uppermost.

Pinch a ridge 2 1/2 to 3 inches high in the canvas to make a trough, and a place for the next piece. Cover dough with plastic while you are forming the rest of the loaves.

After all the pieces of dough are in place, brace the two sides of the canvas with long rolling pins, baking sheets or books, if the dough seems very soft and wants to spread out. Cover the dough loosely with flour rubbed dish towel or canvas, and a sheet of plastic. Proceed immediately to the final rising, next step.

For Small Round Rolls – Petits Pains, Champignons: The principles are the same here as for the preceding round loaves, but make the cushion shape with your fingers rather than the palms of your hands.

For the second stage, during which the ball of dough is rotated smooth side up, roll it under the palm of one hand, using your thumb and little finger to push the edges of the dough underneath and to form the pucker, where the edges join together.

Place the formed ball of dough pucker side up on the flour rubbed canvas and cover loosely while forming the rest. Space the balls 2 inches apart. When risen to almost triple its size, lift gently with lightly floured fingers and place pucker side down on baking sheet. Rolls are usually too small for a cross so make either one central slash or the semi-circular cut.

Step 7: Final Rise – l’appret – 1 1/2 to 2 1/2 hours at around 70 degrees

The covered dough is now to rise until almost triple in volume; look carefully at its pre-risen size so that you will be able to judge correctly. It will be light and swollen when risen, but will still feel a little springy when pressed.

It is important that the final rise take place where it is dry; if your kitchen is damp, hot, and steamy, let the bread rise in another room or dough will stick to the canvas and you will have difficulty getting it off and onto another baking sheet. It will turn into bread in the oven whatever happens, but you will have an easier time and a better loaf if you aim for ideal conditions.

Preheat oven to 450 degrees about 30 minutes before estimated baking time.

Step 8: Unmolding risen dough onto baking sheet – le demoulage.

The 3 pieces of risen dough are now to be unmolded from the canvas and arranged upside down on the baking sheet. The reason for this reversal is that the present top of the dough has crusted over during its rise; the smooth, soft underside should be uppermost in the oven so that the dough can expand and allow the loaf its final puff of volume. For the unmolding you will need a non-sticking intermediate surface such as a stiff piece of cardboard or plywood sprinkled with cornmeal or pulverized pasta.

Remove rolling pins or braces. Place the long side of the board at one side of the dough; pull the edge of the canvas to flatten it; then raise and flip the dough softly upside down onto the board.

Dough is now lying along one edge of the unmolding board: rest this edge on the right side of a lightly buttered baking sheet. Gently dislodge dough onto baking sheet, keeping same side of the dough uppermost: this is the soft smooth side, which was underneath while dough rose on canvas. If necessary run sides of hands lightly down the length of the dough to straighten it. Unmold the next piece of dough the same way, placing it to the left of the first, leaving a 3 inch space. Unmold the final piece near the left side of the sheet.

Step 9: Slashing top of the dough – la coupe.

The top of each piece of dough is now to be slashed in several places. This opens the covering cloak of gluten and allows a bulge of dough underneath to swell up through the cuts during the first 10 minutes of baking, making decorative patterns in the crust. These are done with a blade that cuts almost horizontally into the dough to a depth of less than half an inch. Start the cut at the middle of the blade, drawing toward you in a swift clean sweep. This is not quite as easy as it sounds, and you will probably make ragged cuts at first; never mind, you will improve with practice. Use an ordinary razor blade and slide one side of it into a cork for safety; or buy a barbers straight razor at a cutlery store.

For a 16 to 18 inch loaf make 3 slashes. Note that those at the two ends go straight down the loaf but are slightly off centre, while the middle slash is at a slight angle between the two. Make the first cut at the far end, then the middle cut, and finally the third. Remember that the blade should lie almost parallel to the surface of the dough.

Step 10: Baking – about 25 minutes; oven preheated to 450 degrees (230 degrees C).

As soon as the dough has been slashed, moisten the surface either by painting with a soft brush dipped in cold water, or with a fine spray atomizer, and slide the baking sheet onto rack in upper third of preheated oven. Rapidly paint or spray dough with cold water after 3 minutes, again in 3 minutes, and a final time 3 minutes later. Moistening the dough at this point helps the crust to brown and allows the yeast action to continue in the dough a little longer. The bread should be done in about 25 minutes; the crust will be crisp, and the bread will make a hollow sound when thumped.

If you want the crust to shine, paint lightly with a brush dipped in cold water as soon as you slide the baking sheet out of oven.

Step 11: Cooling – 2 to 3 hours.
Cool the bread on a rack or set it upright in a basket or large bowl so that air can circulate freely around each piece. Although bread is always exciting to eat fresh from the oven, it will have a much better taste when the inside is thoroughly cool and has composed itself.

Step 12: Storing French bread
Because it contains no fats or preservatives of any kind, French bread is at its best when eaten the day it is baked. It will keep for a day or two longer, wrapped airtight and refrigerated, but it will keep best if you freeze it – let the loaves cool first, then wrap airtight. To thaw, unwrap and place on a baking sheet in a cold oven; heat the oven to 400 degrees. In about 20 minutes the crust will be hot and crisp, and the bread thawed. The French, of course, never heat French bread except possibly on Monday, the baker’s holiday, when the bread is a day old.

Step 13: Canvas housekeeping
After each bread session, if you have used canvas, brush it thoroughly to remove all traces of flour and hang it out to dry before putting away. Otherwise the canvas could become mouldy and ruin your next batch of dough.

After trying out this recipe, baking french bread can be very exciting as I had learning something new but by the end of the day I am totally exhausted! . . . . Love Sunny Yaw

Lemon Meringue Tarlets


Lemon Meringue Tarlets

For the Crust:

¾ cup (180 mL) cold butter; cut into ½-inch (1.2 cm) pieces
2 cups (475 mL) all-purpose flour
¼ cup (60 mL) granulated sugar
¼ tsp (1.2 mL) salt
? cup (80 mL) ice water

For the Filling:

2 cups (475 mL) water
1 cup (240 mL) granulated sugar
½ cup (120 mL) cornstarch
5 egg yolks, beaten
¼ cup (60 mL) butter
¾ cup (180 mL) fresh lemon juice
1 tbsp (15 mL) lemon zest
1 tsp (5 mL) vanilla extract

For the Meringue:

5 egg whites, room temperature
½ tsp (2.5 mL) cream of tartar
¼ tsp (1.2 mL) salt
½ tsp (2.5 mL) vanilla extract
¾ cup (180 mL) granulated sugar

For the Crust: Make sure all ingredients are as cold as possible. Using a food processor or pastry cutter and a large bowl, combine the butter, flour, sugar and salt. Process or cut in until the mixture resembles coarse meal and begins to clump together. Sprinkle with water, let rest 30 seconds and then either process very briefly or cut in with about 15 strokes of the pastry cutter, just until the dough begins to stick together and come away from the sides of the bowl. Turn onto a lightly floured work surface and press together to form a disk. Wrap in plastic and chill for at least 20 minutes.

To roll out tartlet dough, slice the dough into 6 pieces. On lightly floured surface, roll each circle of dough into a 5 inch disk. Stack the disks, separated by pieces of plastic wrap, on a plate, and refrigerate for 30 minutes.To bake the dough, position rack in oven to the centre of oven and preheat to 350ºF (180ºC). Place the disks of dough, evenly spaced, on a baking sheet and bake for 20 to 25 minutes, until golden brown. Cool completely.

To finish tartlets, first place oven rack in the upper third of the oven and increase heat to 425ºF.

Divide the lemon filling equally among the disks, mounding it in the centre and leaving a 1-inch border all the way around.
Spoon the meringue decoratively over each tartlet, right to the edges, in dramatic swirling peaks. Return tartlets to oven and bake for about 5 minutes, until the meringue is golden brown.

Preheat oven to 350ºF (180ºC). Line the crust with foil and fill with metal pie weights or dried beans. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes. Carefully remove the foil and continue baking for 10 to 15 minutes, until golden. Cool completely before filling.

For the Filling: Bring the water to a boil in a large, heavy saucepan. Remove from the heat and let rest 5 minutes. Whisk the sugar and cornstarch together. Add the mixture gradually to the hot water, whisking until completely incorporated.

Return to the heat and cook over medium heat, whisking constantly until the mixture comes to a boil. The mixture will be very thick. Add about 1 cup (240 mL) of the hot mixture to the beaten egg yolks, whisking until smooth. Whisking vigorously, add the warmed yolks to the pot and continue cooking, stirring constantly, until mixture comes to a boil. Remove from the heat and stir in butter until incorporated. Add the lemon juice, zest and vanilla, stirring until combined. Pour into the prepared crust. Cover with plastic wrap to prevent a skin from forming on the surface, and cool to room temperature.

For the Meringue: Preheat the oven to 375ºF (190ºC). Using an electric mixer beat the egg whites with the cream of tartar, salt and vanilla extract until soft peaks form. Add the sugar gradually, beating until it forms stiff, glossy peaks. Pile onto the cooled pie, bringing the meringue all the way over to the edge of the crust to seal it completely. Bake for 15 to 20 minutes, or until golden. Cool on a rack. Serve within 6 hours to avoid a soggy crust.








I am now very hungry waiting for my next challenge, as fears had been overcome!

Big Boys Oven

Fraise & Framboise Chocolat Ganache Tartlets


This is a recipe from “The Dessert Book by Chef Hidemi Sugino”….. oh got to tell you, he is one of my celebrity chef that I idol so much, his work is so incredible.

Sweet Tart Dough(Pate Sucree)
Makes 350g

90g unsalted butter, thinly sliced
60g confectioners’ sugar
30g whole egg
20g almond flour
150g all-purpose flour, plus more for work surface

1. Combine butter and sugar in food processor, and process for 4 to 5 seconds
2. Gradually add egg, almond flour and all-purpose flour, processing 4 to 5 seconds after each addition.
3. Scarping down mizture between additions. Total processing time may be 12 to 15 seconds, or until dough just holds together. Do not over-mix.
4. Place into airtight plastic bag and flatten with a rolling pin. Refridgerate for 2 to 3 hours.
5. On a lightly floured surface, roll out dough into 2.5 to 3mm thick. Prick all over with a fork. Place dough onto a tart pan loosely, the floured surface up, and press dough into pan.
6. Trim dough, by rolling a pin on dough. Press sides and bottom tightly onto pan. Cut away any exess dough with a knife.
To make tartlets, cut dough one size larger than the pans after rolling out. Then trim the overhanging dough with a knife after pressing into pans. If you don’t use all the dough, freeze the rest.


Fraise & Framboise Chocolat Ganache
(I had altered some of the ingredient to suit the taste and liking.)

80g frozen framboise(rasberry) puree
10ml framboise Monin syrup
10ml fraise Monin syrup
70ml heavy cream(whipping cream)
150gm dark chocolat (bittersweet)
30gm soft unsalted butter

1. Bake tart case: Roll out dough and place into baking pans; prick bottom of dough all over with a fork, bake in a 170C over the oven for 10 to 12 minutes; let cool.
2. Make ganache: Heat the puree until just starting to melt, remove from heat. Add syrups; set aside until completely melted by remaining heat. Return to heat, add heavy cream and bring to boil.
3. In a large bowl, place chocolat, add hot puree-cream mixture, whisking little by little, drawing small circles until emulsify completely. Add butter in small pieces, mix well until shiny.
4. Pour ganache into tart cases and spread evenly. Garnish with fresh fraise or framboise.(can serve with vanilla ice cream)

Something simple and yet will trigger the wildest taste of your guests. For sure you will be a great host of the day……

Big Boys Oven

Maple Cranberry Oatmeal Cookies

Oatmeal cookies that are crisp on the outside and soft on the inside are a classic that never goes out of style. This cookies enhances the perennial favourite with maple syrup and plenty of dried cranberries.


1 3/4 cups unbleached all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1/2 cup unslated butter, at room temperature
1 cup packed dark brown sugar
1/3 cup granulated sugar
2 large eggs
1/2 cup maple syrup
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1 3/4 cups oatmeal(not quick cooking)
1 1/2 cups dried cranberries


Position a rack in the middle of the oven. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper.

Sift the flour, baking soda, salt and cinnamon into a medium bowl and set aside. in a large bowl, using an electric mixer on medium speed, beat the butter, brown sugar and granulated sugar until smoothly blended, about 1 minute. Stop the mixer and scrape the sides of the bowl as needed during mixing. On low speed, add the eggs, maple syrup and vanilla and mix until blended, about 1 minute. mix in the flour mixture to incorporateit. mix in the oatmeal, then the cranberries.

Using an ice cream scoop or measuring cup with a 1/4 cup capacity, scoop mounds of dough onto the prepared baking sheets, spacing the cookies at least 2 1/2 inches apart. (Optional: place a fresh cranberry to top of each cookie)

Bake the cookies one sheet at a time until the tops feel firm and the tops and bottoms are lightly browned, about 18 minutes. Cool the cookies on the baking sheets for 5 minutes, then use a wide metal spatula to transfer the cookies to a wire rack to cool completely.

The cookies can be stored in a tightly covered container at room temperature for up to 4 days.

I had tried this recipe and love it! ….. I guess it is about time for you try it too.

Big Boys Oven

Maple Cranberry Oatmeal Cookies

Big cookies are always my favourite type of midnight and coffee break snack. I always love them chewy and big and they are called big chewy cookies. I also found a shop in KLCC called Bakin’ Boys which also sells big cookies. They have many varieties such as solitair, cranberry basket, coconut cabaret, the double decker dream, the praliner, the babanut, the martian fellow, white socialite, the milkman meltdown and also orange ovation.

Big chewy cookies are formed by several simple methods. Many of them are members of the familiar drop cookie family, made by dropping scoops or spoonfuls of dough onto baking sheets. Several others are made by rolling the dough into balls or logs. Logs are usually cut into slices after they bake.

When deciding whether or not a chewy cookie is done, take the short route: underbaking rather than overbaking is the way to go. if baked a few minutes too long, chewy cookies can dry out and lose their soft texture. Baking them a minute or two less only makes them more chewy. These are the cookies you want to slip into lunch boxes, pack into picnic baskets, take to a potluck, leave on the counter for anytime-of-day snacks, or send off in the mail.

As for today’s post, I would like to share with you my favourite BIG CHEWY COOKIE, Maple Cranberry Oatmeal Cookies adapted from Elinor Klivans’s BigFatCookies. I had tried this recipe and really can tell you that…. they are so gorgeous, so chewy and so delicious.

Oatmeal cookies that are crisp on the outside and soft on the inside are a classic that never goes out of style. This cookies enhances the perennial favourite with maple syrup and plenty of dried cranberries.


1 3/4 cups unbleached all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1/2 cup unslated butter, at room temperature
1 cup packed dark brown sugar
1/3 cup granulated sugar
2 large eggs
1/2 cup maple syrup
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1 3/4 cups oatmeal(not quick cooking)
1 1/2 cups dried cranberries


Position a rack in the middle of the oven. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper.

Sift the flour, baking soda, salt and cinnamon into a medium bowl and set aside. in a large bowl, using an electric mixer on medium speed, beat the butter, brown sugar and granulated sugar until smoothly blended, about 1 minute. Stop the mixer and scrape the sides of the bowl as needed during mixing. On low speed, add the eggs, maple syrup and vanilla and mix until blended, about 1 minute. mix in the flour mixture to incorporateit. mix in the oatmeal, then the cranberries.

Using an ice cream scoop or measuring cup with a 1/4 cup capacity, scoop mounds of dough onto the prepared baking sheets, spacing the cookies at least 2 1/2 inches apart. (Optional: place a fresh cranberry to top of each cookie)

Bake the cookies one sheet at a time until the tops feel firm and the tops and bottoms are lightly browned, about 18 minutes. Cool the cookies on the baking sheets for 5 minutes, then use a wide metal spatula to transfer the cookies to a wire rack to cool completely.

The cookies can be stored in a tightly covered container at room temperature for up to 4 days.

I had tried this recipe and love it! ….. I guess it is about time for you try it too.

Love Sunny Yaw

Toasted Almond and Strawberry Jam Cookies Sandwiches

The shape of these jam-filled almond cookie sandwiches is limited only by your choice of cookie cutters, circles, rectangles, heart and stars are all good choice. If no cookies cutters, just cut the dough into neat rectangules or squares. The top cookie has a hole cut of its centre and is sprinkled with powdered sugar, so the bright jam shines though a white sugar-dusted top. Seedless rasberry, blueberry or blackberry jam make other good filling choices.


2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, at room temperature
3/4 cup powdered sugar, plus extra for dusting
1 teaspoon vanilla extract (monin syrup)
3/4 teasppon almond extract (monin syrup)
1 cup (about 4 ounces) whole blanched almonds toasted and finely ground
6 tablespoons strawberry jam

Sift the flour and salt into a medium bowl and set aside. In a large bowl, using an electric mixer on medium speed, beat the butter and 3/4 cup powdered sugar until smooth and slightly lightened in color, about 1 minue. Stop the mixer and scrape the sides of the bowl as needed during mixing. On slow speed, mix in the vanilla, almond extract, and ground almonds. Mix in the flour mixture just until the flour is incorporated and the dough holds together.

Divide the dough in half and form into two 6-inch disks. Warp each one in plastic wrap and refrigerate the dough until it is cold and firm enough to roll, about 40 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees F. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper.

Remove one piece of dough from the refrigerator. Put the dough between 2 large sheets of wax paper and roll it into a rectangle about 12 by 8 inches and 1/4 inch thick. Remove the top piece of wax paper and discard it. Use a cookie cutter to cut out 3 1/2 inch circles (or any shape you like) from the dough, leaving the cookies on the wax paper. Turn the wax paper over, peel off the paper and use a metal spatula to help palce the circles 1 inch apart on one of the preparedbaking sheets. (The cookies do not spread much.) Set aside the dough scraps. Using 2 clean pieces of wax paper, roll and cut the second piece of dough. Gather together all of the dough scraps, forming a smooth disk, and repeat the rolling and cutting process. You should have 20 cookies.

Cut a 1 inch circle (or other shape) from the centre of half of the cookies and remove these circles from the cookies (the wide end of a pastry tube works well for cutting the circles). The dough “holes” can be baked along with the cookies for snacks.

Bake the cookies one sheet at a time until the edges are light brown and the tops firm, about 18 minutes. Cool the cookies for 15 minutes on the baking sheets, then use a wide metal spatula to transfer them to a wire rack to cool completely.

Turn the cookies without the holes botttom side up. Leaving a 1/4 inch edge, spread a rounded teaspoon of jam over each one. Sift powdered sugar over the cookies with the hole and place them on top of the jam-covered cookies.

The cookie sandwiches can be stored in a tightly covered container at room temperature for up to 3 days.

I love and adore this cookies as the scent of almond will bring the freshness in you and sweetness of jam makes you feel so divine. I hope you will give it a go soon as festive season is just so near.

Big Boys Oven

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