Tag Archives: Bean Paste

Philips Airfryer Recipe Korean Pork Eye Fillet

Airfried Korean Pork Eye Fillet 5
Airfried Recipe Korean Pork Eye Fillet

At recent in my little pantry I wanted to make something simple and fast, doesn’t take up too much time to prepare and get ready. I found a small slab of pork eye fillet sitting in the freezer. That piece truly looked interesting. I am sure it will be something nice to bite into. Having them sliced and hammered to thin, I got about 6 nice pieces of pork eye fillet.

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Recipe Baby Pork Ribs with Taucu Bean Paste

Baby Pork Ribs with Taucu Bean Paste 2
Baby Pork Ribs with Taucu Bean Paste

I love this dish, it is really nice especially with the present of the aroma of taucu bean paste. I cooked this dish using the pressure cooker and found the sauce retained inside the pot. Therefore I would recommend to reheat it on the stove to reduce the sauce (to thicken the sauce). I think it will be even nicer. The sauce from the pressure cooker itself it also damn tasty too. Another good dish executed perfect, nearly there . . . . . . Sidney Kan

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Dragon Feast and Yee Sang at Si Chuan Dou Hua Restaurant ParkRoyal Kuala Lumpur

Tropical Fruit Yee Sang
Yee Sang at Si Chuan Dou Hua Restaurant at Park Royal

DId I tell you that I was on a dragon feast recently . . . . . I guested not since I was totally hypnotised with the awesome delicious food experience at Si Chuan Dou Hua. This time without fail I had my indulge of Yee Sang, something different this round. Tropical fruit Yee Sang was platted for all the guests, vibrant colours with juicy attraction.

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Restaurant Serdang Baru (1) Lenggong Valley Inspired

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Restaurant Owner with The Sultan Fish from Lenggong Valley

My journey for good food and authentic taste had brought me to yet another exciting dimension located at Serdang. My stop for that night was at Restaurant Serdang Baru (1) who believed in dishing out gorgeous dishes with freshness ingredients from Lenggong Valley, Perak especially fresh water fish.

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Si Chuan Dou Hua Restaurant PARKROYAL Kuala Lumpur

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I had been here before as I can recall it was a business dinner and the food was really impressive. The Si Chuan Doi Hua Restaurant is located at PARKROYAL Kuala Lumpur is the third outlet of the Si Chuan Dou Hua chain of restaurant opened in 2003. The first one opened in Singapore at PARKROYAL on Beach Road in 1966 followed by the second branch at the panoramic 60th floor of UOB Plaza Singapore in 2002.

The other night I dropped by the restaurant with friends to taste the eight (8) course banquet dinner. I just admired the interior of this simple and yet elegant restaurant. It was very smartly organised with glass penaling making the restaurant look bigger with true comfort. Modern comfort dining chairs and tables were well in place while the ceiling can with hooked bright red cloth lantents. It was truly a beautiful decorated restaurant and admiring those displayed creamic plates and vases was what I did. Great pieces of collection

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The Amazing Tea Server

We were uniquely served with the restaurant’s signature tea. My jaw was wide opened when observing the tea server. The tea server had years of training, combining skills of Chinese Martial Arts, Dance and Gymnastics to perform elegant tea-pouring moves from a metre-long nose bronze kettle. I was told that the tea server had a degree in the art of tea pouring. It was truly a memorable dining experience. Everyone was excited upon every tea pouring. Just love Si Chuan Dou Hua

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The Restaurant’s Signature Eight Treasure Tea

The Chinese tea served by the tea server was the Eight Treasure Tea which contained Wolfberries, Red Dates, Chrysanthemum, Rock Sugar, Jasmine, Dried Longan, Billy Bob and Winter Oats. I was informed that it helps to cool down the body while able to flush out the oil in the oily food away from our internal system. The Chinese believes it has the healing effect to the body too. The Eight Treasure Tea from Si Chuan Dou Hua is at RM55++ that comes in a set box of 8 boxes.

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Luscious Szechuan Wontons by Master Chef Thye Yoon Kong Zing Grand Mellennium KL

Szechuan style hot and sour wanton Master Chef Thye Yoon Kong
Szechuan Style Hot and Sour Wontons

A MASTERCLASS ! At The Epicure Malaysia recently Master Chef Thye Yoon Kong of Zing located at Grand Mellennium Kuala Lumpur demostrates how to make the classic Chinese Dim Sum – Szechuan style hot and sour wontons. The room was 3/4 full, participants were very focus while waiting patiently for the wontons making. I loved wanton, it was eaten even when I was a little boy. It was the ladies favourite dish making in the kitchen. It always come with the egg noodles “wontons noodle” soup and served warm.

Chef Thye Yoon Kong specialising in Dim Sum, introduced larger size of wontons during the class. It was like dumplings. Every wanton skin is filled with 30gm of solid seasoned minced chicken, chuncks of shrimps and chopped mushroom. What make this wontons so delightful? it was the special made sauce recipe created by chef himself, the Szechuan hot and sour sauce. It was very flavourful and tasty. One was truly not enough, maybe a few, it was that good.

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Restaurant De Hunan

I was introduced to this Hunan Restaurant by Chef Steven and was told that the dishes served here is gorgeous. I was told it is a must order for the Mao’s Pork and also the steam fish head with salted red chillies. So what I did? I step into this gorgeous eatery.


I had tasted Mao’s Pork when I visited Mao’s Restaurant in Beijing. This Mao’s Pork dish in Beijing tasted very different from what we usually get in Kuala Lumpur. It taste so soft, tasty and so succulent. Lovely! When I was at this eatery, firstly we were served with some unique tibits:

Seaweed Pickle

Lotus Root Pickle

Yummy thin slices Pig Ears


3 plates of tibits to start off with which is so delicious.

A lovely bowl of steam rice.

A skewered prawn top with black bean paste, lovely. Here we get bigger prawns but in Beijing the prawn is so micro small, lol!

“Lat Chee Kai” Hot Peppered Chilli Chicken

OMG! Mao’s Pork….authentic lovely! A must for Porkie lovers!

Pig’s Tail Claypot….. very delicious and with a touch of hot!

Oh! Lovely Hot Fish Head….. a must for hot lovers… “just like chasing the dragon”

Emperor noodles to be eaten with the fish head gravy…. fantastic!

If you are a porkie and also a fan of hot hot food, this is a place to be! Beijing on your doorstep!.

Restaurant De Hunan
No 2, Jalan Kuchai Maju 6
off Jalan Kuchai Lama
58200 Kuala Lumpur
Tel: 03-7987 9318
Opens: 11am – 11pm

From myself, Sidney

Mid-Autumn Festival – Mrs Cheng’s Mooncake


Mrs Cheng’s Mooncake

Mid-Autumn Festival is intricately linked to the legends of Chang E, the mythical Moon Goddess of Immortality

In Ming revolution mooncakes were used as a medium by the Ming revolutionaries in their espionage effort to secretly distribute letters in order to overthrow the Mongolian rulers of China in the Yuan dynasty. The idea is said to be conceived by Zhu Yuanzhang (???) and his advisor Liu Bowen (???), who circulated a rumor that a deadly plague was spreading and the only way to prevent it was to eat the special mooncakes. This prompted the quick distribution of the mooncakes, which were used to hide a secret message coordinating the Han Chinese revolt on the 15th day of the eighth lunar month.

Another method of hiding the message was printed in the surface of mooncakes as a simple puzzle or mosaic. In order to read the encrypted message, each of the 4 mooncakes packaged together must be cut into 4 parts each. The 16 pieces of mooncake, must then be pieced together in such a fashion that the secret messages can be read. The pieces of mooncake are then eaten to destroy the message.

Mooncake is a Chinese pastry traditionally eaten during the Mid-Autumn Festival. Typical mooncakes are round or rectangular pastries, measuring about 10 cm in diameter and 4-5 cm thick. A thick filling usually made from lotus paste is surrounded by a relatively thin (2-3 mm) crust and may contain yolks from salted duck eggs. Mooncakes are rich, heavy, and dense compared with most Western cakes and pastries. They are usually eaten in small wedges accompanied by Chinese tea.

There are many types of fillings can be found in traditional mooncakes according to the region’s culture and lotus seed paste (??, lían róng) is considered by some to be the original and most luxurious mooncake filling, lotus paste filling is found in all types of mooncakes. Due to the high price of lotus paste, white kidney bean paste is sometimes used as a filler.

Ingredients
500g lotus seeds with skins, washed
1 tbsp alkaline water (kan sui)
3½-4 cups water
350-375g castor sugar
450g oil
1-1½ tbsp maltose (mak ngah tong)

Method
Put lotus seeds into a large mixing bowl. Add alkaline water and steep for 5-10 minutes. Pour boiling water over the seeds then cover and soak for 10 minutes. Drain the water from the seeds then add cold water. Next, completely remove the skins from the seeds by rubbing them off. If whole lotus seeds are used, remove the green centres then boil seeds in water until soft and tender.

Blend the cooked lotus seeds into a fine paste in an electric blender or food processor. Heat up a wok and melt half the sugar until it turns lightly golden. Add lotus seed paste. Cook, stirring all the time until the lotus seed paste thickens. Add in the remaining sugar and pour in the oil a little at a time. Continue to cook until it is thick. Stir in maltose. Use a wooden spatula to stir until the paste leaves the sides of the wok. Dish up and leave to cool before use.

Crusts
Traditional mooncake vary widely depending on the region where the mooncake is produced. While most regions produce traditional mooncakes with many types of fillings, they usually only make their mooncake from one type of crust or another. Although vegetarian mooncakes may use vegetable oil, many mooncakes use lard in their recipes for an optimum mouthfeel. There are three types of mooncake crust used in Chinese cuisine:

Chewy: This crust has a reddish-brown tone and glossy sheen. It is the most common type of crust used on Cantonese-style mooncakes. It is also the most commonly seen type of mooncake in North America and many western countries. Chewy mooncake crusts are made using a combination of thick sugar syrup, lye water, flour, and oil, thus giving this crust its rich taste and a chewy yet tender texture. Chewiness can be increased further by adding maltose syrup to the mixture.

The dough is also baked into fish or piglet shapes (Cantonese: “Jue Zai Bang”; ???; lit. “Piglet Biscuits”) and sold at mooncake bakeries as a chewy snack. They often come individually packaged in small plastic baskets, to symbolize fish being caught or piglets being bound for sale.

Flaky: Flaky crusts are most indicative of Suzhou-style mooncakes. The dough is made by rolling together alternating layers of oily dough and flour that has been stir-fried in oil. This crust has a very similar texture to the likes of puff pastry.

Tender: Mooncakes from certain provinces of China and Taiwan are often made to be tender rather than flaky or chewy. The texture of this type of mooncake crust is similar to the likes of the shortcrust pastry used in Western pie crusts or tart shells. Tender crusts are made mainly of a homogenous mix of sugar, oil, flour, and water. This type of crust is also commonly used in other type of Chinese pastries, such as the egg tart.

Ingredients
400g golden syrup
1/2 tsp bicarbonate of soda
1 1/2 tbsp alkaline water (kan sui)
100g corn oil
550g flour
A few drops of dark soy sauce

Method
Mix sieved bicarbonate of soda, golden syrup, alkaline water and oil with a wooden spoon and allow to rest for 4-5 hours in a basin. Add the dark soy sauce, then fold in sifted flour gradually and mix evenly to form a smooth and soft dough. Let the dough rest for another 6-7 hours. Divide dough into even balls, each weighing 40-50g.

Divide the dough into even pieces of 40g each. Roll the dough into a ball and flatten out with your hand.Weigh the lotus seed paste. If you like the yolk of salted eggs, you can insert one in the centre.

Place the filling in the middle of the flat dough and slowly wrap around it. Seal the edges and roll dough lightly between your palms until the filling is hidden.

Dust mould lightly with flour. Press doughball into the mooncake mould. Knock the mould against the table to dislodge the mooncake.

Bake in a preheated oven at 180 ºC for 10 minutes. Remove and leave to cool for 5 minutes. Brush on beaten egg glaze. Return to bake for another 10 minutes or till golden.

Note
Do not overbake mooncake otherwise filling will overflow and mooncake will lose its shape.



A lovely piece of moomcake with salted egg yolk, full of flavour. Reduction in sugar will make the mooncake less sweet.


Dragon Fruit Ping Pei Mooncake or Chilled Mooncake

Ingredients

Filling:
Lotus paste

Pastry (Skin):
225g kao fun (cooked glutinous rice flour)
200g sugar
290ml water
1 tbsp condensed milk
3 tbsp shortening
25g dragon fruit paste

Method
Boil water and sugar together until sugar dissolves. Leave to cool, add in condensed milk and mix well.Sift kao fun into the cooled syrup solution. Add in shortening, dragon fruit paste and mix into a smooth dough. Leave aside, covered, for 15-20 minutes.Divide dough into equal portions. Wrap dough around filling. Press into mooncake mould, knock out and chill in the refrigerator.

Mrs Cheng’s mooncakes are gorgeous, lovely and delicious. I just can’t get enough of her mooncakes. If you like to taste Mrs Cheng’s mooncake, she can be contacted at 016 2783089 located in Petaling Jaya.

Hope you will have a great mid-autumn festival eating and serving mooncakes over a cuppa of jasmine tea or a cuppa of black coffee.


Love Sunny Yaw
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